Tag Archives: Gardening Advice

Organic Herbal Gardening Can Make You Healthier!

Organic herbal gardening is a topic that had been gaining prominence, especially on the context of growing your own plant-based and natural medicines. A growing number of people are considering alternatives to a health system that is completely based on chemically derived pharmaceuticals.

Herbalism, as it is usually called, involves collecting or growing your own plants and herbs for medicinal purposes, which has a century-old tradition in many parts of the world. Nowadays, organic gardening is the way to go if you want to grow your own, as it’s better to avoid raising therapeutic plants on pesticides and fertilizers.

The viewpoint of herbal medicine is one of considering the whole organism and not just the symptoms. As a result two people who visit a practitioner and have similar symptoms, may be suggested to take quite different remedies.

Often, people who turn to organic herbal gardening to cure ailments such as colds, headaches or menstrual pain already grow their own vegetables at home, but this is not a necessary precondition. You can simply grow medicinal plants, which usually take up less space than vegetables.

People who turn to organic herbal gardening to grow natural medicines are usually highly aware of their bodies and also of their surroundings, and place a lot of importance on the quality and provenance of the food that they consume.

In fact organic gardening is going through a renaissance, but not many people are yet aware that the same principles that can be applied to organic food are also valid for plant-based medicines. And fewer yet know how easy it is to grow herbal remedies at home!

Often herbal remedies have been grown commercially under organic conditions, but the enterprising gardener can add a series of curative plants to the produce in his backyard, garden or windowsill and, armed with a good treatise on the subject, self-administer the results.

There are several ways to consume organically grown medicinal plants. The easiest one is simply to eat them, whether raw or cooked, and many therapeutic plants are part of normal kitchen usage, such as garlic or pepper.

You can also prepare herbal teas and brews. Plus, ingesting organic herbs is not the only way to consume them. You can also prepare balms and creams with many organically gardened herbs, and use them to relieve aches and inflammations.

There are a number of ways in which you can grow herbal remedies thanks to organic herbal gardening. You can obtain the seeds yourself either from a specialist shop or, You can find Internet supplier that will send you seeds and shoots for organic herbal gardening.

Check out OrganicHerbalGardening.com for comprehensive resources on how to organize your herbal garden. Click on a link to find all the information that you may want about organic gardening at your fingertips.

Japanese Gardening

Japanese gardening is a cultural form of gardening that is meant to produce a scene that mimics nature as much as possible by using trees, shrubs, rocks, sand, artificial hills, ponds, and flowing water as art-forms. The Zen and Shinto traditions are both a large part of Japanese gardening and, because of this; the gardens have a contemplative and reflective state of mind. Japanese gardening is much different than the Western style and most would say it is far more meditational and soul soothing.

In Japanese gardening there are three basic methods for scenery. The first of these is reduced scale. Reduced scale is the art of taking an actual scene from nature, mountains, rivers, trees, and all, and reproducing it on a smaller scale. Symbolization involves generalization and abstraction. An example of this would be using white sand to suggest the ocean. Borrowed views refers to artists that would use something like an ocean a forest as a background, but it would end up becoming an important part of the scene.

There are essentially two types of Japanese gardening: tsukiyami, which is a hill garden and mainly composed of hills and ponds. The other is hiraniwa, which is basically the exact opposite of tsukiyami: a flat garden without any hills or ponds.

The basic elements used in Japanese gardening include rocks, gravel, water, moss, stones, fences, and hedges. Rocks are most often used as centerpieces and bring a presence of spirituality to the garden. According to the Shinto tradition rocks embody the spirits of nature. Gravel is used as a sort of defining surface and is used to imitate the flow of water when arranged properly. Stones are used to create a boundary and are sculpted into the form of lanterns. Water, whether it be in the form of a pond, stream, or waterfall, is an essential part of a Japanese garden. It can be in the actual form of water or portrayed by gravel, but no matter what form water is in, it is crucial to a Japanese gardens balance.

There are several forms and types of plants that are signature of Japanese gardening, the main one being Bonsai. Bonsai is the art of training everyday, average plants, such as Pine, Cypress, Holly, Cedar, Cherry, Maple, and Beech, to look like large, old trees just in miniature form. These trees range from five centimeters to one meter and are kept small by pruning, re-potting, pinching of growth, and wiring the branches.

Japanese gardening is a tradition that has crossed the Muso Soseki, poet, said